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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
international issues of the day such as our topic for tonight, u.s./pakistan relations. on behalf of the wefpg and our board members who are present tonight, dawn, gayle, donna and teresa, i want to welcome everybody here. we're so glad that you could join us for this behind-the-headlines event. these are events on hot issues in the news, and recently we've done events on egypt, libya, women in the middle east, um, and our event tonight is with ambassador husain haqqani, the pakistani ambassador to the who will be joined by our friend and frequent speaker and moderator, washington post's senior national security correspondent karen deyoung. for a conversation on u.s./pakistan relations. the event could not be more timely, as we all know, given the increased tensions in the relationship between the two countries following the killing of osama bin laden. we're so pleased to have the ambassador with us tonight to explore the complexities and the importance of this relationship and extremely lucky to have karen back. i want to recognize a few guests who are here with us tonight, undersecretary of
and pakistan. we must always be on guard. i am advised this figure is significantly reduced. international forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been we
in the tribal regions of yemen, but in the foxtrot and pakistan and also in parts of north africa. and in somalia. ultimately, the nctc's mission is to stop another terrorist attack and if i may just say that the leadership of mike leiter and an acting capacity of andrew lieb and i think nctc has played a vital role but it is a team approach and we face a challenging at times as we ever have. >> are you confident that we have the ability to get no work across the agencies as you obviously to coordinate and integrate all of that analyses? do you think we have got it? >> i think we have made a lot of progress. i do think as this committee and this report on the abdulmutallab attack of december 25, 2008 demonstrated, -- or 2009 that we have, we still face challenges and particularly i reviewed the vice chairman's and senator burmex's separate opinion which was quite critical and appropriate so i think it certainly of nctc. senator if i may say, think the greatest challenge facing nctc is the greatest strength that it brings together analysts, planners and other professionals to bring
pakistan's failure to act against militant extremists like the network in the north, the afghan taliban and other militant extremists. we will be interested in hearing general dempsey's thoughts on how to get the pakistan military to go after terrorist groups finding sanctuary in pakistan's tribal regions. al qaeda and the arabian peninsula in yemen and al qaeda elements in somalia continue to take advantage of failing and failed states to train their operatives and to plan attacks against the united states and our interests. it is critical that we don't apply significant pressure to these terrorist organizations, and to work with governments and international organizations in the region to address the long term problems. iran remains probably the greatest risk to world peace and to regional stability. we share the concerns of many nations about iran's continued support of terrorist activities beyond its borders, development of its missile programs, and refusal to cooperate with the international atomic energy commission. while we've seen evidence that the international sanctions has pu
and associated groups outside of afghanistan, pakistan and iraq. director leon panetta expressed concerns on the shifting to other places most notably in yemen, somalia, north africa, and i hope he will address what you see as the appropriate role for the special operation forces in those areas. in announcing lieutenant general allan's nomination, president obama called him, quote, the flight commander to take over the vital mission in afghanistan. if confirmed, the general will have big boots to fill and succeeding general petraeus commander of the 49 member international security assistance force coalition and u.s. forces afghanistan. like general petraeus, general allen brings an in-depth understanding of the complexities of the counterinsurgency effort based on his own experience as the commander in anbar province in iraq. working with the sunni awakening the marines and anbar succeeded in getting local sunni tribal leaders to reject the insurgency and instead support the iraqi government and its the deputy commander at u.s. central command general ellen has developed a regional persp
and pakistan over the past year, counterterrorism efforts in yemen must be a central focus of our national security strategy. that said, our -- closely in line with political, economic and developmental challenges as well. those challenges are those that the united states must work to address as part of a holistic approach to this challenge. first of all, just outlined three. three priorities. first, we need a better understanding of the political opposition and prospects for democratic reform. acting president, the vice president in yemen, as only a small power base in the opposition appears fractured between the so-called joint meeting parties, jmp. and other individuals such as the former commander of the first armored division and check out omar, leader of the powerful fellow. over the weekend elements of the opposition asked the formation of a shadow government to the composition and support, i should say though the -- for those the composition and support for the group remains unclear. it is clear however that the transition process will take place sooner or later. the president has
money to countries that waste it -- pakistan. keep military, share the wealth between branches, and don't cut education." the president: you know, the one thing i would say is, on the notion of giving money to countries that waste it -- and pakistan is listed there -- i think it's important for people to know that foreign aid accounts for less than 2 percent of our budget. and if you defined it just narrowly as the kind of foreign aid to help feed people and what we think of classically as foreign aid, it's probably closer to 1 percent. so sometimes people have an exaggerated sense that we spend 25 percent of the federal budget on foreign aid. it's a tiny amount that has a big impact. and i think america, to be a leader in the world, to have influence, to help stabilize countries and create opportunity for people so that they don't breed terrorists or create huge refugee flows and so forth, it's smart for us to make a very modest investment in foreign aid. it's a force multiplier and it's something that even in tough fiscal times america needs to continue to do as part of our role a
counterproductive. it definitely saddens me to see the deteriorating pakistan united states relations. after especially my period between 2,002,008 which some mutual understanding, mutual cooperation and understanding the role that both of this play in fighting the war on terror. ladies and gentlemen, i would like to start by analyzing the existing environment and its historical perspective. how did religious militancy get introduced into the region and into pakistan, especially if pakistan is that the dumb of terrorism or the perpetrator of terrorism.
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)